Commit 3666db27 authored by Geoff Cox's avatar Geoff Cox

Update Readme.md

parent 8493b825
......@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ So, what are the implications of coding framed in terms of literacy, and for who
In 2016, Nick Montfort, a poet and professor of digital media at MIT, published *Exploratory Programming for Arts and Humanities*, a hands-on approach to programming. In the appendix, he outlines three key reasons in response to the question "Why Program?"<sup>[6](#myfootnote6)</sup> This includes: how learning to program allows us to think in new ways by bringing different methods and perspectives to raise new questions; how programming offers us a better understanding of culture and media systems, and consequently, we can learn to develop better, or better analysis of, cultural systems; and lastly, how programming can help us improve society by means of creating, designing and discovering programs. We are in broad agreement with Montfort on these points, but at the same time we see this as a means to open up how we might work differently, and think with programming to speculate on alternative forms and political imaginaries.
As the opening chapter of this book, to get started -- to `Begin()` -- we think that it is important to reflect on why we need to learn to program, and hopefully this will help to sustain motivation across subsequent chapters. Imagining that our readers do not necessarily want to become professional programmers, we stress programming as a means to think otherwise (as we tried to outline in the Preface). We have ourselves learnt from others along the way, challenging our preconceptions, especially through the experience of working with students with little or no programming experience. Learning to code can be enjoyable and rewarding but also annoying and frustrating, especially concerning complex syntax and structure. It takes time to familiar oneself with precise and unforgiving computational logic and procedures, but hopefully the case for the importance of learning to program is established by now. On one level, the choice is simple: *to program or be programmed*. [Note: We take this from Douglas Rushkoff's *Program or Be Programmed: Ten Commandments for a Digital Age*, New York: OR books, 2010.]
As the opening chapter of this book, we introduce some ideas and exercises to get started -- to `Begin()` -- and to reflect on why we need to learn to program, and hopefully this will help to sustain motivation across subsequent chapters. Imagining that our readers do not necessarily want to become professional programmers, we stress programming as a means to think otherwise (as we tried to outline in the Preface). We have ourselves learnt from others along the way, challenging our preconceptions, especially through the experience of working with students with little or no programming experience. Learning to code can be enjoyable and rewarding but also annoying and frustrating, especially concerning complex syntax and structure. It takes time to familiar oneself with precise and unforgiving computational logic and procedures, but hopefully the case for the importance of learning to program is established by now. On one level, the choice is simple: *to program or be programmed*. [Note: We take this from Douglas Rushkoff's *Program or Be Programmed: Ten Commandments for a Digital Age*, New York: OR books, 2010.]
### 1.1 Start()
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